Things To Consider When Buying A Home With A Well

Well inspections are critical when buying a home with a well as the primary water source. Buyers considering homes in rural settings will often encounter homes for sale that get their water from wells.

With homes drawing on municipal sources, there is an assumption that the water in the home will be readily available and meet the safety standards of the municipality.

But with well water, you cannot make any assumptions about its purity. Beyond water quality, other problems can arise with wells that you should be aware of, and check for, before you agree to purchase a home.

Whether buying or selling a home, there are always questions that come up regarding testing the water when a private well services a property.

If you are purchasing a home that is serviced by a well and not by public water you better make darn sure that you have it tested as part of your contingency of sale!

When you are testing the water, you are going to want to do what is known as quality and quantity test. Both of these tests are equally important as you want to make sure the water is safe but also that you will have enough to service the home properly.

One of the primary concerns you should have as a buyer purchasing a home with a well is to check the quantity of water delivered to the home and the quality.

Keep reading for some of the best tips for checking on well quantity and quality when buying a home.

Do Your Research About Water in The Area

Groundwater is a shared resource across broad areas, so problems that affect one home will often affect many, many more. You can research known water issues in an area through the EPA, and you can ask your Realtor of any known water problems in the area. Once you know of common problems, you can be on the lookout for them.

Know The Regulations For The Area Where You Are Buying.

Different states and sometimes municipalities have rules and regulations concerning wells in the area, regulations you should be aware of as you go to buy a home. Depending on the area, the seller of the home may be required to test the well water before selling you the home.

In most locations, it is the buyer’s responsibility to check the well’s quality and quantity. Well inspections should never be skipped when buying a home.

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